Last edited by Yogul
Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

5 edition of Wolves, Bears, and Their Prey in Alaska found in the catalog.

Wolves, Bears, and Their Prey in Alaska

Biological and Social Challenges in Wildlife Management

by National Research Council (US)

  • 61 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by National Academy Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Animal ecology,
  • Conservation of wildlife & habitats,
  • Environmental economics,
  • Vertebrates,
  • Nature,
  • Environmental Studies,
  • Nature/Ecology,
  • USA,
  • Environmental Conservation & Protection - General,
  • Life Sciences - Ecology - Ecosystems,
  • Wildlife,
  • Mammals,
  • Alaska,
  • Bears,
  • Control,
  • Wildlife management,
  • Wolves

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages207
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10358008M
    ISBN 100309064058
    ISBN 109780309064057

    A great book that delivers a clear picture of life in Alaska in the early 's. It is one thing to travel the frost heaved bumpy Richardson Highway in a vehicle doing 65 miles an hour. It is another thing to walk the miles crossing glacier fed streams, bumping into grizzly bears, and trying to find game for food/5. On the other hand, it may be the direct result of bears and wolves competing for prey like juvenile moose. " We think this may be the case, in the spring, when newborn ungulates make easy pickings.

    Wolves, Bears, and Their Prey in Alaska: Biological and Social Challenges in Wildlife Management Committee on Management of Wolf and Bear Populations in Alaska, National Research Council This free executive summary is provided by the National Academies as part of our mission to educate the world on issues of science, engineering, and health.   Alaska's moose management: Science or comic-book biology? of ungulates eaten by wolves and bears. The public hasn't been privy to information on .

    Wolves, Bears, and their Prey in Alaska. Washington DC: National Academy Press; ISBN Course Objective: Introduce the principal components of wildlife biology and management through presentations and discussions with local wildlife biologists. Assessment. His real life stories paint a clear picture of true wolf behavior that often contrasts with today's romanticizing of the animal. If you are interested in animal damage control trapping, early Alaska or just good observations on wolves and their prey from someone who spent a lot of time with them, this book will entertain and educate you.5/5(5).


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Wolves, Bears, and Their Prey in Alaska by National Research Council (US) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Wolves, Bears, and Their Prey in Alaska Biological and Social Challenges in Wildlife Management Author: National Research Council,Division on Earth and Life Studies,Commission on Life Sciences,Committee on Management of Wolf and Bear Populations in Alaska.

Download a PDF of "Wolves, Bears, and Their Prey in Alaska" by the National Research Council Wolves free. Download a PDF of "Wolves, Bears, and Their Prey in Alaska" by the National Research Council for free. Copy the HTML code below to embed this book in your.

Wolves, Bears, and Their Prey in Alaska: Biological and Social Challenges in Wildlife Management This book assesses Alaskan wolf and bear management programs from scientific and economic perspectives.

Relevant factors that should be taken into account when evaluating the utility of such programs are identified.

The assessment includes a. Wolves, Bears, and Their Prey in Alaska: Biological and Social Challenges in Wildlife Management Paperback – Octo by National Research Council (Author), Division on Earth and Life Studies (Author), Commission on Life Sciences (Author), & Author: National Research Council, Division on Earth and Life Studies, Commission on Life Sciences.

BOARD ON BIOLOGY M ICHAEL T. C LEGG (Chair) University of California, Riverside, CA JOHN C. A VISE, University of Georgia, Athens, GA D AVID E ISENBERG, University of California, Los Angeles, CA G ERALD D. F ISCHBACH, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA D AVID J.

G ALAS, Darwin Molecular Corporation, Bothell, WA D AVID G OEDDEL, Tularik, Incorporated, South San Francisco, CA. Wolves, Bears and Their Prey in Alaska by National Research Council,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.3/5(1).

Overview of Relationships Between Bears, Wolves, and Moose in Alaska. Relationships between large predators and their prey in Alaska are complex, and no one model fits all situations.

It is possible to generalize about some situations, particularly in Interior Alaska. Copies of Wolves, Bears, and Their Prey in Alaska: Biological and Social Challenges in Wildlife Management are available from the National Academy Press at the mailing address in the letterhead; tel.

() or Reporters may obtain copies from the Office of News and Public Information at the letterhead address (contacts. Get this from a library. Wolves, bears, and their prey in Alaska: biological and social challenges in wildlife management. [National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Management of Wolf and Bear Populations in Alaska.].

Wolves (Canis lupus) are in the Canidae family which includes foxes, coyotes, and Alaska two subspecies are recognized, wolves in Southeast Alaska, and wolves in the remainder of the state. Size: Male wolves can exceed pounds (91 kg) though this is rare.

The average adult male weighs about pounds ( kg) and is about inches ( cm) tall at the shoulder. Wolves, bears, and their prey in Alaska: Biological and social challenges in wildlife management: biological and social challenges in wildlife management. Average Rating.

Author. National Research Council, Committee on Management of Wolf and Bear Populations in Alaska. Publisher. National Academy of Sciences. Pub. Date. Approved methods included shooting wolves and their pups in dens, using bait to hunt bears, killing mother bears with their cubs — and one made.

Wolves, Bears, and Their Prey in Alaska: Biological and Social Challenges in Wildlife Management () This book assesses Alaskan wolf and bear management programs from scientific and economic perspectives. Relevant factors that should be taken into account when evaluating the utility of such programs are identified.

The assessment. The National Park Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will review rules that prevent Alaskans from killing wolves and bears while mothers are sleeping with cubs and pups.

With ample prey of moose, deer and beaver, wolf recovery in the Northeast will continue. Wolves may be on their way to natural recovery in the near future. More sightings of possible wild wolves in Maine and the movement of wolves in southern Quebec have led to this belief.

That brain fog is detrimental most to the wolves who slowly starve of too few prey in the predator: prey ratio. Continue to blame hunters if you must, but sport and indigenous subsistence hunting account for only % of moose/ caribou mortality while; wolf predation is 85% from the studies in 5/5(3).

Watch as a pack of wolves stumble upon the scent of a buffalo carcass held by a couple of bears. Bears and Wolves fighting for Dinner Grizzlies and Wolves, Alaska Bear Viewing. Living With Wolves. Wolves are common over much of Alaska, especially in non-urbanized areas.

They are the wild ancestors and genetic source of all modern breeds of domesticated dog. Their life history is both familiar to many of us and quite distinct from that of.

The wolf (Canis lupus), also known as the "gray wolf" or "grey wolf", is a large canine native to Eurasia and North is the largest extant member of Canidae, males averaging 40 kg (88 lb) and females 37 kg (82 lb).On average, wolves measure – cm (41–63 in) in length and 80–85 cm (31–33 in) at shoulder height.

The wolf is also distinguished from other Canis species by Class: Mammalia. Footage if grizzlies and wolves from expeditions on the coast of Alaska. For more info visit:. Fluctuations in wolf population size are closely tied to changes in population levels of prey animals.

Wolves in Alaska are managed as both game and fur-bearing animals. To read more extensive information on the status of wolves in different regions of Alaska, visit the Alaska Department of.

WOLVES FOR THE BEARS This book is fifth one in the Grey Wolf Pack alert. What's fascinating about the married bear couple who find their true mates and it's not each other.

I love this series but I wish it could be sold as a box set, maybe at a bargain price. S. Otto4/5.After more than a decade of trying to work with the state of Alaska’s Board of Game, the Park Service finalized its own commonsense regulations in to specifically protect bears, wolves and other wildlife on national preserves from state predator control regulations.

On Alaska’s national park lands, bears and wolves are in the crosshairs.